How the United States is Growing


FACT: 72% of U. S. population growth in the next 20 years will come from immigrants, or the children of immigrants.

  • If current trends continue, the population of the United States will rise to 438 million in 2050, from 296 million in 2005, and 82% of the increase will be due to immigrants arriving from 2005 to 2050 and their U.S.-born descendants.
  • Of the 117 million people added to the population during this period due to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children or grandchildren.
  • Among the other key population projections: Nearly one in five Americans (19%) will be an immigrant in 2050, compared with one in eight (12%) in 2005. By 2025, the immigrant, or foreign-born, share of the population will surpass the peak during the last great wave of immigration a century ago.
  • The major role of immigration in national growth builds on the pattern of recent decades, during which immigrants and their U.S.-born children and grandchildren accounted for most population increase. Immigration’s importance increased as the average number of births to U.S.-born women dropped sharply before leveling off.
  • The Latino population, already the nation’s largest minority group, will triple in size and will account for most of the nation’s population growth from 2005 through 2050. Hispanics will make up 29% of the U.S. population in 2050, compared with 14% in 2005.
  • Births in the United States will play a growing role in Hispanic and Asian population growth; as a result, a smaller proportion of both groups will be foreign-born in 2050 than is the case now. The non-Hispanic white population will increase more slowly than other racial and ethnic groups; whites will become a minority (47%) by 2050. The nation’s elderly population will more than double in size from 2005 through 2050, as the baby boom generation enters the traditional retirement years. The number of working-age Americans and children will grow more slowly than the elderly population, and will shrink as a share of the total population.

Resources for Above Statistics

The above information about changing demographics in the United States comes from the Pew Research Center’s report, “Immigration to Play Lead Role In Future U.S. Growth U.S. Population Projections: 2005-2050 by Jeffrey Passel and D’Vera Cohn, Pew Research Center February 11, 2008. The Center’s projections are based on detailed assumptions about births, deaths and immigration levels–the three key components of population change. All these assumptions are built on recent trends. But it is important to note that these trends can change. All population projections have inherent uncertainties, especially for years further in the future, because they can be affected by changes in behavior, by new immigration policies, or by other events. Nonetheless, projections offer a starting point for understanding and analyzing the parameters of future demographic change. Download the complete report at http://pewresearch.org

The statistic appearing on the homepage is taken from “How Many Americans?” by Leon F. Bouvier and Lindsey Grant